Episode 54 Transcript

Welcome to the Genealogy News from Geneatopia

I’m Patty Roy, also known as Dinah Larkham in Second Life.

Today is Saturday November 15, 2014 and this is Episode 54.

WikiTree has added two new features to help those who have taken a DNA test and match with someone to determine the ancestor they have in common. The new Relationship Finder tool can be used to identify ancestors that two or more people share in common.

The Relationship Finder doesn’t just find the first shared ancestor, it finds all the common ancestors. The first common ancestor may not be the one for the match with a shared segment of autosomal DNA.

It will also filter the common ancestors shared by many people. This will enable you narrow down who the common ancestor is for the DNA match.

There is a Relationship Finder page where you enter the IDs for the two people with a relationship. Or you can click the Relationship Finder icon on a profile, Trusted List, or your Watchlist. The Relationship Finder does not use your DNA results; it helps you find common ancestors between people.

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Ancestry has announced that coming soon will be improved matching for AncestryDNA autosomal tests. The improvements will make AncestryDNA matching more accurate. This will be rolled out to all existing AncestryDNA members for free. They will not need to take another DNA test. You’ll get an email when your new DNA matching results are ready.

New algorithms will be used to find and predict relationships through DNA. This means that the list of your matches will be a little smaller, since the less accurate ones will not be displayed any more.

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The search form at Ancestry will be changing. This will be rolled out over the next few weeks.

The term “Advanced Search” is now called “Show more options.” This will let you add more items to your search.

As you enter a word to search for, you’ll see a link appear where you can change how exact or board you want the search to be.

Another change appears at the bottom of the page in the Collection section. You will now be able to set the country you want to see results from. In the previous version, results from the country specified would be listed on top with some records from other countries also listed.

Anne Gillespie Mitchell has made a 5-minute video about the changes and of course I’ll have a link in the show notes to it.

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Ancestry has partnered with the Oklahoma Historical Society to add more than 3.2 million American Indian records and images available to Ancestry subscribers. The records are available now.

These new records include census counts, treaties, land allotments, marriage certificates and citizenship documents.

One collection called Oklahoma and Indian Territory, Dawes Census Cards for Five Civilized Tribes, 1898-1914 are in color. This makes the documents easier to read to see all the writing. Previous black and white images made some areas too dark to read.

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Ancestry has also added London, England Workhouse records for parishes in central and west London. These are provided in association with the London Metropolitan Archives. More records from other areas of London are expected to be added soon.

And they’ve added Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps service records 1917-1920, and Women’s Royal Naval Service (1917 – 1919). These last two collections are from The National Archives of the UK.

Another World War I collection has been added for records of people who served in WWI and were entitled to medals and awards. The records are mostly for those who served in the Army but there are some records for the Royal Flying Corps/Royal Air Force, civilians in military establishments such as doctors and nurses in hospitals, and others who were involved with the War.

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Ancestry will be having Twitter chats using the hashtag #AncestryChat. These chats will be about a specific topic and moderated by professional genealogists at Ancestry.

These chats will be 1- 2 times per month. They will be announced on the Ancestry Facebook page under “Events.”

The next chat is scheduled for November 20th and the topic will be Native American Research.

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The latest research guide from Ancestry is for Nevada. In the guide you’ll find out about the history of Nevada, significant dates, where to find vital records, military records, and other collections and state resources.

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FamilySearch adds more than 3.4 million indexed records and images to the Bahamas, Cape Verde, Peru, and the United States

FamilySearch Adds More Than 1.2 Million Indexed Records and Images to Argentina, the Dominican Republic, France, and the United States

FamilySearch Adds More Than 3.7 Million Indexed Records and Images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, and the United States

More new records at FamilySearch

New browsable image collections added include
Australia, New South Wales, Census (fragment), 1841
Canada, Nova Scotia Probate Records, 1760–1993
Cape Verde, Republic of Cape Verde, Catholic Church Records, 1787–1957
Peru, Municipal Census, 1831–1866
US, Iowa, County Death Records, 1880–1992
US, Ohio, Crawford County Church Records, 1853–2007
US, Ohio, Licking County, Hartford Township Records, 1881–1962
US, Ohio, Northern District, Eastern Division, Naturalization Index, 1855–1967

This collection for Iowa, I’ve used and it is indexed. There’s been some update to it and it isn’t a new browsable collection as they have listed.

The next collection has had indexed records and images added to an existing collection
Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903–1998
Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874–1996
Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005
US, BillionGraves Index
US, New York, State Census, 1865

The next collections have added indexed records to an existing collection
Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635–1981
France, Protestant Church Records, 1536–1863
South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801–2004
US, California, San Francisco Passenger Lists, 1893–1953
US, Kentucky Death Records, 1911–1961
US, Louisiana, Orleans Parish Second District Judicial Court Case Files, 1846–1880
US, Maine, Nathan Hale Cemetery Collection, ca. 1780–1980
US, Virginia, African-American Funeral Programs, 1920–2009

These collections have added images to an existing collection
Dominican Republic, Civil Registration, 1801–2010
Isle of Man, Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598–2009
US, California, San Mateo County, Colma, Italian Cemetery Records, 1899–2011
US, Idaho, Lincoln County Records, 1886–1972
US, Illinois Probate Records, 1819–1988
US, Louisiana, Orleans Court Records, 1822–1880
US, Louisiana, Orleans Parish Will Books, 1805–1920
US, Louisiana, State Penitentiary Records, 1866–1963
US, Maryland, Register of Wills Records, 1629–1999
US, New Hampshire, Cheshire County, Probate Estate Files, 1886–1900
US, North Carolina, County Records, 1833–1970
US, Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813–1932
US, Ohio, Trumbull County Records, 1795–2010
US, South Dakota, School Records, 1879–1970
US, Tennessee, Cocke County Records, 1860–1930
US, Tennessee, Probate Court Files, 1795–1955
US, Utah, Cache County Records, 1861–1955
US, Virginia, Isle of Wight County Records, 1634–1951
US, Washington, County Marriages, 1855–2008
US, Washington, County Records, 1803–2010
US, Washington, Pierce County Marriage Returns, 1891–1950

And this next collection has added indexed records to an existing collection.
Bahamas, Civil Registration, 1850–1959

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FamilySearch has also added some new military collections. Veteran’s Day was November 11th and in commemoration of that day FamilySearch added three new World War I collections. These records were made available in collaboration with the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington DC, The National Archives in Kew, Surrey, England, and findmypast.com.

The new collections are

United States World War I Draft Registration Cards 1917-1918
United Kingdom WWI Service Records 1914-1920
United Kingdom WWI Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps Records 1917-1920

All the FamilySearch History Centers and the Family History Library in Salt Lake City will have available the MyHeritage Library Edition. MyHeritage’s new service provides libraries access to their records.

There are more than 4,700 FamilySearch History Centers in 134 countries. These history centers are open to anyone and they provide resources to help you find your ancestors. You can order microfilm from the Family History Library and view it in the history center. The history centers also provide free access to many subscription services such as

19th Century British Newspapers
Newspaper Archives
Alexander Street Press (American Civil War Collections)
Ancestry.com (Family History Library Edition)
ArkivDigital Online (for Swedish research)
FindMyPast
Fold3.com
HeritageQuest Online
Historic Map Works (Library Edition)
Origins.net
Paper Trail, A Guide to Overland Pioneer Names and Documents
WorldVitalRecords.com

Your public library probably has access to Ancestry Library Edition and HeritageQuest Online.

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MyHeritage has introduced a new and enhanced online family tree editor. The old tree editor was based on Adobe Flash technology which is not very popular today.

The new tree editor has been developed from scratch using new technology such as HTML5 and Angular JS. The new tree editor is faster and easier to use. And it runs on smart phones and tablets.

Record matches can be accessed directly from the new tree editor. These are matches in historical records for the person being displayed in the editor.

The new version of the online tree editor has been released gradually to get feedback from users. This past week MyHeritage made the new version available to all users.

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MyHeritage is collecting favorite holiday recipes and the stories behind them for a cookbook. A selection of the best recipes will be included in a special international holiday cookbook.

The one with the best recipe and story will win a personal chef to prepare a delicious meal for you and your family in your home.

To enter send an email to stories@myheritage.com with a subject line of Holiday Recipe. Send the recipe, a story, and photos. The photo can be the dish, a holiday family photo, or a photo of whose recipe it is.

The final cookbook will be posted on the MyHeritage blog.

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MyHeritage has announced partnerships with a national TV marketing initiative to strengthen its presence in the Netherlands. MyHeritage will support the Aldfaer Foundation which has a free genealogy program written in Dutch called Aldfaer. The support from MyHeritage will allow the Foundation to offer integration of MyHeritage’s Smart Matching and Record Matching to users of the Aldfaer program.

MyHeritage will also partner with Bob Coret of Coret Genealogie. He is a respected genealogist and technologist in the Dutch genealogy community. He runs Genealogie Online, an online family tree publishing service.

Mr. Coret will become a strategic advisor and technologist with MyHeritage to work on offerings in the Netherlands and develop new opportunities within the Dutch market.

MyHeritage matching technologies will be added to the Genealogie Online service. Those users will not need to transfer their data to MyHeritage to make new discoveries. There will be more intergrations with MyHeritage and Coret Genealogie in the future.

There will be a TV ad campaign in the Netherlands for MyHeritage. The ad shows a MyHeritage user sharing their stories using the service. It’s narrated by a well-known Dutch celebrity actor. Besides the TV ad in the Netherlands, there is also another national TV campaign in Norway.

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Findmypast has announced a partnership with the Wall Street Journal. Subscribers to the Journal can get a complimentary three-month subscription to Findmypast.

First you have to sign up for WSJ+ membership which is free for Wall Street Journal subscribers. This is a subscriber loyalty program of The Wall Street Journal

To join WSJ+ you have to agree to some new terms.

Also WSJ+ users can get a complimentary year of Evernote premium. This is only for U.S subscribers and you must be past your initial trail period of your WSJ subscription.

With this version of Evernote you can access Journal content in Evernote, save and clip articles from The Wall Street Journal straight to Evernote.

Currently this Evernote offer applies to iOS only, Android is coming soon.

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Findmypast has added over 444,000 UK probate records for York, Lichfield, Cheltenham, Surrey, Sussex, Kent, and Gloucestershire. In these collections you’ll find probate indexes, wills, inventories, administrations, and abstracts

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They’ve also added Thom’s Directory 1844 – 1900. This is a useful census substitute for tracing families in Dublin.

It’s a street directory and almanac. It lists the merchants, clergy, lawyers, gentlemen, masons, blacksmiths, and others who were working in Dublin.

Findmypast has released over 256,000 new wills and probate records. The following collections were added:

Oxfordshire Wills index 1516-1857
York Peculiars Probate Index 1383-1883
Somerset Medieval Will abstracts 1385-1558
Hertfordshire Probate records index 1415-1858
England & Wales published wills & probate indexes 1300-1858
Surrey, Prerogative Court of Canterbury will abstracts 1736-1794
London & Middlesex Will Abstracts 1700-1704
Lancashire Wills Proved at Richmond 1457-1812
London, Court of Husting will abstracts 1258-1688

And they’ve added lots of records for Devon. There are many new records for baptisms, banns which are announcement of marriages, marriages starting with the year 1446, and burials from 1320 – 1926. There is a Devon wills index spanning the years 1163 to 1999 and it contains over 250,000 records proved by 30 courts.

10 years of Pettigrew & Oulton’s Dublin Almanac & General Register of Ireland has been added to the Newspapers, Directories and Social History records. It contains a street by street directory of Dublin from 1835 to 1845.

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BillionGraves has added some new features. You will now have 14 days instead of 7 days to transcribe your own photos before they are added to the general transcription pool. This gives more time to those photographers who want to transcribe their own photos.

There is a new linking records feature found on the transcription page. This allows you to link images together easily to make a complete record.

They have added functions for managing your images. You can easily correct errors of transcribed records, delete unwanted images that were uploaded, and link records. This gives you the ability to easily manage your own photos.

Sticky Filters have been updated to remember your selected transcribing filters between sessions. The next time you return, BillionGraves will remember where you left off.

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Dick Eastman is a well-known genealogist who writes Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. You can read it in blog format or get it in an emailed version that is sent weekly.

Dick has started another blog called Privacy Blog and you can find it at privacyblog.com. He posts about security and privacy issues and how you can improve your privacy and be secure.

Titles of recent posts were

How to Find a Lot of Personal Information about Anyone
Cell Phone Privacy, Opt-Out Settings Don’t Protect Your Security Online
Why Are We Still Using Social Security Numbers to Identify Ourselves?
19 Automakers Vow to Protect Driver Privacy

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Fold3 is making its World War II collection available for free until the end of November. Some of the most popular titles in the collection are

Missing Air Crew Reports, WWII
WWII US Air Force Photos
WWII “Old Man’s Draft” Registration Cards
WWII War Diaries

Some new and updated titles in the collection include the following

Ardelia Hall Collection: Wiesbaden Property Cards
307th Bomb Group Records
500th Bomb Group Records
70th Infantry Division Records

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The Detroit News has moved to a new location and in preparation staffers have been poring over 100 years worth of information. They’ve placed most to this archival material online for the public to use.

One useful item will be the indexed cards to find articles in the newspaper. It should be available online within two or three months at SeekingMichigan.org.

10 to 14 million images from the newspaper will be digitized and placed online. Most of these are from 1980s – 2002. An index will be created for these photos and there will be galleries created.

Some of the materials will need to be accessed at the Archives of Michigan.

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The city of Greenville, Michigan has its newspapers online thanks to the Greenville Library. The newspapers date back to 1857.

Funding came from the Greenville Area Community Foundation’s Stafford Fund for Community Enhancement. It allowed for the microfilm containing the newspapers to be digitized. Optical character recognition was used to make the newspapers searchable.

The following newspapers were digitized:

Greenville Independent
The Daily Call
The Greenville Daily News
Belding Banner
The Daily News

The years from 1857 to 1923 are available online. The years from 1924 to 2010 are only available at the library due to copyright restrictions. These later years have also been digitized.

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The California State Library is digitizing more than 10,000 3-D photos. These photos are known as stereoscopic photos that were popular in the late 1800s.

There were like postcards but they need to be viewed using a hand-held viewer that turned the two photos into a single 3-D image.

The photos were taken by professionals and amateur photographers. The subjects range from scenic vistas, major events, and portraits of Americans at work and play.

They are placing the photos at a site called Phereo, a 3-D photo-sharing site. From there you can view the images in different formats. You can see the individual images side-by-side. If you have the red-and-blue cardboard glasses you can view the images in full 3-D.

So far there are only 93 images available to view out of the 10,000. The images can be found at phereo.com/CaliforniaStateLibrary.

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The CanadianHeadstones site has had the one millionth headstone photo uploaded. The Headstone Photo Project is a non-profit organization run by volunteers. The project was launched in 2009 to photograph and transcribe tombstones across Canada.

At the site there is a separate website and database for each province and territory. It’s a free site where you can search by surname, first name, starts with, contains, and sounds like.

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Saskatchewan newspapers are starting to be available online. This first stage focuses on Saskatchewan newspapers published during the Great War, 1914 – 1918. There are newspapers from across the province, which were published in English, French, German, and Ukrainian.

Right now you can only search by newspaper title, article name, and place. In the future you should be able to search the full text of the articles. And of course you can browse the newspapers by date.

Eventually the site will contain all the newspapers from 1878 through to the mid 1960s.

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There’s a new YouTube channel you may be interested in. The British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO) has launched its YouTube channel with a recent lecture by Lucille Campey. Her presentation was titled “Ignored But Not Forgotten: Canada’s English Immigrants.” It was recorded during the 20th Annual BIFHSGO Family History Conference held September 19-21, 2014 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

The presentation was about a book written by Lucille Campey. The title of the book is the same as the title of the presentation. The talk gives an overview of English immigration into Canada mostly during the early twentieth century.

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These next few items about Canada come from Gail Dever who writes the blog Genealogy à la carte.

The first item of interest is a comprehensive list of groups and pages on Facebook that pertain to Canadian genealogy.

Gail compiled the list. She got the idea from Katherine R. Wilson who has created a similar list. However, Katherine’s list does not contain any groups and pages that are in French. Gail’s list does contain groups and page in French as well as English.

Gail plans to keep the list up-to-date and she will be issuing a new list every few months when there have been a sufficient number of additions.

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Another item of interest from Gail’s blog is another new YouTube channel. This one in French but it is old videos. So even if you don’t speak French, the videos may be of interest to you.

The YouTube channel is from the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ) or Library and National Archives of Quebec. It contains films about Quebec’s cultural heritage.

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Another item of interest for those with Quebec ancestry is a new site that contains an index of articles published by the Genealogical Society of Quebec and the French-Canadian Genealogical Society.

The articles are indexed by subject or keyword, title, author, and years.

Gail mentions on her blog not to be daunted by the French text. It’s easy to figure out. Google translate can help you find French words to search by.

The results from a search will show you the name of the article and the publication. So hopefully you will be able to find a copy. One of the publications, The Ancestor, can be ordered online from the web site for the Genealogical Society of Quebec.

Another publication, Memories, can be ordered from the French-Canadian Genealogical Society website.

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A new database has come online for some historical photographs from Winnipeg, Manitoba. The site is called Winnipeg FOCUS and contains photographs and graphic materials held by the City of Winnipeg.

Many of the photographs were taken by civic employees in the course of their work to document projects. Some photographs were donated to the Archives.

The images have been tagged with key information by the Archives’ staff. Additional key information will be added and everyone is encouraged to participate in this process by submitting comments.

At the moment, the collection includes only a fraction of the thousands of images in the Archives holdings. Additions to the website will be on going.

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Another new website about Canada is called Canada’s Great War Album. It’s based on a book by the same name which you can purchase from the website.

The book and site contain family stories and photographs from the First World War.

At the website there’s information about battles and other sections about the war. There are some videos and you can submit your story at the website.

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There is a new licensing scheme in the UK that gives access to about 91 million orphan works. Orphan works are those that the copyright holder cannot be determined. In the United States these works are protected under copyright law and cannot be made digitally available.

In the UK under the new scheme these orphan works can be reproduced on websites, books, or TV. If the copyright holder is found, they will be paid for how their work was used.

Some of the creative works that can be made available will include diaries, photographs, oral history recordings, and documentary films.

More of these works will become available online and be displayed in museums.

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The British Library, Wikimedia, and OpenStreetMap are trying to identify all the maps in the Mechanical Curator collection. These maps were extracted and digitized from 19th century books. They have been placed on Flickr and tagged with “map.”

They need people to flag more images on Flickr as maps. Then they need people to create an overlay of historic maps on current mapping and compare the past with the present.

Those wishing to participate with this effort will need a Flickr account to view the maps then use the British Library’s Georeferencer crowd activity to match the old map with where it corresponds with a recent map.

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The British Newspaper Archive has reached a major milestone. It now has 9 million historical newspaper pages online.

They focus on local titles from all around the UK. It was launched in November 2011. It now has 282 British and Irish newspaper titles online, covering the years 1710 – 1954.

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British genealogy research website TheGenealogist has released over 81,000 records of records of Mentioned in Dispatches from the First World War. Searching these records will bring up the rank, regiment, data mentioned in the London Gazette, the page number, and type of decoration.

From these records you can find soldiers and army nurses who were recognized for their acts of gallantry. The records were created when the recipient’s name appeared in an official report sent to the high command.

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The website Essex Ancestors is maintained by the Essex Records Office. It a subscription site and has parish registers and wills for Essex.

They have added another 22,500 wills to the site. The site already contained 20,000 wills and now it contains over 40,000 wills.

The Essex Records Office has 70,000 wills so more will be coming online.

The online collection now contains wills dating from the 1400s to 1720. They will be working on the years 1720 – 1858 to get the whole collection online.

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There’s a new website that contains information on soldiers from Australia and New Zealand. It’s called “Discovering Anzacs” and is to commemorate the centenary of World War I.

The website is the result of a partnership between the National Archives of Australia and Archives of New Zealand. Both organizations have been digitizing their World War I service records and they can now be found at one website.

Previously the National Archives of Australia had a website called “Mapping our Anzacs.” All entries from that website have been migrated to the new website.

Anyone can contribute to the site by entering stories, images, or comments at the site. And they can help transcribe the records.

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If you have Irish ancestors you may remember that many birth, marriage, and death indexes became available online at irishgenealogy.ie. That happened last July and they were quickly taken down.

The indexes were for the years 1845 until today. The Data Protection Commissioner in Ireland thought the indexes exposed too much sensitive personal information.

The Data Protection Commissioner had been consulted about the launch of the indexes and thought they would be about historical information and not information about living individuals.

A compromise has been reached so that recent information will not be available. The Data Protection Commissioner agreed that if it was limited to data on births more than 100 years old, marriages more than 75 years old and deaths more than 50 years old, they could be placed online.

The bill for this to occur has passed the committee stage. The indexes are still not available.

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The Irish War Memorial Records contain the list of names of over 49,000 men who died in the First World War. This list contains many errors and double-entries. Also they include non-Irish soldiers who died in Irish regiments and they exclude some Irish who died in non-Irish regiments.

When the records were created they did not include the navy or the artillery. They also did not include other battalions that had Irish soldiers such as the Canadian and Australian battalions.

Using these records it’s difficult to determine how many Irish men were killed in the war. Historians believe that it could be between 30,000 and 40,000.

The records are found at a website called Ireland’s Memorial Records from the In Flanders Fields Museum.

A scholarship is being set up for students to spend time with the records to make collections more accurate. Scholarships are available for 5 students to spend the summer months at the In Flanders Field Museum. Their task is to expand the digital archive that was begun earlier this year by Google and the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Scholarships will begin next year and run until 2018.

Google has also announced a digital exhibition commemorating the Irish in the war at the Google Digital Cultural Institute. The exhibit aims to preserve the memory of the Irish who perished during the war. It contains information about the Irish War Memorial Records.

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The Commonwealth War Grave Commission has created an app for searching for cemeteries around the world where casualties from the First and Second World Wars are buried.

The app uses your location to show you cemeteries nearby or you can search for cemeteries to see images from the cemetery.

The app works on Apple, Android, and Windows devices.

You can also find a more comprehensive version of it at their website. From the website version you can get a list of those who are buried in the cemetery or search by surname to find out where soldiers are buried.

The Guild of One-Name Studies has announced three new services.

The first new service is a pilot project that will allow members to record surname interests other than their registered name(s). Members will not have to register a full-blown one-name study in order to record an interest in a surname. It’s hoped that this will lead to an increase in the number of surnames registered for a one-name study.

The second new service is a project to make it easier for members to work together on large studies such as surnames like Smith. Study associates will allow members to collaborate on a one-name study. They will be able to help when a member is no longer actively conducting research or where someone no longer wants to be the owner of the study.

The third new service is a pilot project that will enable members to preserve their one-name study with the Guild. This will allow the one-name website of each participating member to continue indefinitely as a live website.

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There is a new society called The Surname Society. It’s not associated with the Guild of One-Name Studies. Quoting from the press release

the online society for individuals, groups and associations with an interest in surname studies, regardless of their location in the world, the surname they are studying, or their level of research expertise.

The Chair of this new society is Kirsty Grey. She was previously the Chairman of The Guild of One-Name Studies in the UK until this past April. This new society is also based in the UK with a similar theme. Kirsty Grey is also the cofounder of the Society for One-Place Studies.

Members of the new society are encouraged to develop their own study methods in their investigations into a surname. A study can be worldwide or restricted to a certain area. The Surname Society will help and advise members on ways to conduct their study.

Collaboration is entirely online. It’s hoped to develop new surname studies using modern technologies to support 21st century researchers.

The cost to join the society is £5 yearly which is $7.82 as of the day of this recording which is November 15, 2014. Once you have joined you can register as many names as you want.

They are planning on having two Google Hangouts per month. One will be for Europe and Australia on the second Saturday of the month and the other one for the month will be for Europe and the America on the fourth Saturday. You may want to check those Saturdays, that’s what’s posted on the website but in the Google Hangout announcing the new society they mentioned the hangouts would be the first and third Saturdays of the month.

They have lots more things planned that will be coming online.

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The National Library of Estonia has launched DIGAR Estonian Newspapers. DIGAR stands for digital archive.

There are 85 newspapers at the portal that were published before 1944 and newspapers that were publish since January 1, 2014. The other years require agreements from the publishers.

And of course the site is in Estonian.

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The National Genealogy Society has announced the full program for the 2015 Family History Conference that will be held in St. Charles, Missouri, May 13 – 16, 2015. The theme of the conference is Crossroads of America.

The registration brochure gives details about social events, tours, workshops, and the daily conference program with the name of the lecture, the speaker, and a brief description of the presentation.

Registration will open December 1, 2014 for the conference.

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The big joint conference coming up in February 2015 is RootsTech and the Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference. They have announced that the keynote speaker for Friday will be A. J. Jacobs. He’s the guy who is setting up the Global Family Reunion that will be held in New York this coming June.

The Global Family Reunion is open to anyone but the fun is to see if you are somehow related to A. J. Jacobs. If you are you will get a bracelet at the reunion and be part of the biggest family photo.

There will be a $20 admission fee that will go toward Alzhemier’s research.

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Popular musician and YouTube sensation Alex Boye along with One Voice Children’s Choir, a quarter-finalists from NBC’s America’s Got Talent, kick off RootsTech 2015 with performances on Thursday, February 12th at the Salt Palace Convention Center.

The two musical talents have collaborated before and will be uniting to give a special performance.

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The 2017 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference will be held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 30 – September 2.

The 2016 conference will be in Springfield, Illinois and the 2018 conference will be in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

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The Federation of Genealogical Societies will be having a cruise to Alaska that will depart from Seattle, Washington, and last 7 days.

The ports of call will include Alaskan cities Juneau and Skagway and Victoria and British Columbia.

This is a genealogy cruise, so not only to you get to see the sights, you can also attend lectures while at sea. The speakers for this cruise will be Elizabeth Shown Mills, David E. Rencher, Judy G. Russell, and D. Joshua Taylor.

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Registration for The Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR) at the Samford University Library will open on Tuesday, January 20th. These session fill up fast so you need register as soon as registration opens.

The 2015 Institute begins Sunday, June 7th, and concludes Friday, June 12th. The courses for 2015 are

Methods and Sources (Coordinator: Pam Sayre)
Intermediate Genealogy & Historical Studies (Coordinator: Angela McGhie)
Advanced Methodology & Evidence Analysis (Coordinator: Judy Russell)
Writing & Publishing for Genealogists (Coordinator: Tom Jones)
Military Records II (Coordinator: Craig Scott)
The Five Civilized Tribes: The Records & Where to Find Them (Coordinator: Linda Geiger)
Land Records: Using Maps (Coordinator: Rick Sayre)
Research in the South: The Colonies of the South (Coordinator: Mark Lowe)
Genealogy as a Profession (Coordinator: Elissa Powell)
Virginia’s Land & Military Conflicts (Coordinator: Victor Dunn)

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FamilySearch has announced some webinars for 2015. During the month of January there will be 10 webinars about England and Wales. Then in April there will be 9 webinars about Scotland. And in July there will be 5 webinars about Wales.

Illinois Genealogical Society has announced their 2015 free webinar lineup. These webinars are typically held the second Tuesday of each month at 9pm eastern.

They are free for anyone to attend live and members of the society have access to them through the Members Section of the ISGS website to watch anytime.

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Coming up

Monday, November 17, 8pm eastern
Board for Certification of Genealogists Webinar
‘Of Sound Mind and Body’: Using Probate Records in Your Research
presented by Michael Hait

Tuesday, November 18, 1pm eastern
Ancestry Live Event
Can Anyone Read This? Basic Paleography for Genealogists
presented by Crista Cowen

Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 3pm eastern
New England Historic Genealogical Society
Sharing Your Family History: Ideas from NEHGS
presented by Penny Stratton

Tuesday, November 18, 8pm eastern
Wisconsin State Genealogical Society Webinar
Time Travel with Google Earth
presented by Lisa Louise Cooke

#genchat – The UK Archives
Wednesday, November 19th, noon eastern

Wednesday, November 19, 1pm eastern
MyHeritage Webinar: Discover your military ancestors

Wednesday, November 19 2014, 2pm eastern
Legacy Webinar – Using Evernote for Genealogy
presented by Lisa Louise Cooke

Wednesday, November 19, 8pm eastern
Georgia Genealogical Society
What’s a Palatine Anyway?
presented by James M. Beidler

Wednesday, November 19, 9pm eastern
Southern California Genealogical Society
The WWI Draft Card: Don’t Do Research Without It!
presented by Tim Pinnick

Thursday, November 20, 1pm eastern
Ancestry Live Event
AncestryDNA: Q&A
presented by Crista Cowen

Thursday, November 20, 8pm eastern
#AncestryChat
Native American Research

Thursday, November 20, 8pm eastern
Florida State Genealogical Society Poolside Chat
On Mountain or Prairie: Treasures in Federal Land Records
presented by Warren Bittner

Thursday November 20, 9pm eastern
Utah Genealogical Association
“Using Technology to See Things More Clearly”
presented by Peg Ivanyo

Friday, November 21, time to be announced
North Carolina Genealogical Society
Finding a North Carolina Revolutionary War Ancestor
presented by Craig Scott
free to view Fri, 5 Dec 2014 – Sun, 7 Dec 2014

Friday, November 21, 8pm eastern
Twitter #IDGChat – Brick Walls
http://theindepthgenealogist.com/2014-idgchat-schedule/

Tuesday, November 25, 1pm eastern
Ancestry Live Event
Genealogy Source Checklists
presented by Crista Cowen

#genchat – Accessing state collections
Friday, November 28th, 10pm eastern
And that’s it for this episode.

You can send email to geneatopia@gmail.com

You can find links to things mentioned in this show in the show notes at Geneatopia.com as well as a transcript. The transcript can also be found in the Geneatopia Flipboard magazine.

This is episode 54.

Thanks for listening.
Welcome to the Genealogy News from Geneatopia

I’m Patty Roy, also known as Dinah Larkham in Second Life.

Today is Saturday November 15, 2014 and this is Episode 54.

WikiTree has added two new features to help those who have taken a DNA test and match with someone to determine the ancestor they have in common. The new Relationship Finder tool can be used to identify ancestors that two or more people share in common.

The Relationship Finder doesn’t just find the first shared ancestor, it finds all the common ancestors. The first common ancestor may not be the one for the match with a shared segment of autosomal DNA.

It will also filter the common ancestors shared by many people. This will enable you narrow down who the common ancestor is for the DNA match.

There is a Relationship Finder page where you enter the IDs for the two people with a relationship. Or you can click the Relationship Finder icon on a profile, Trusted List, or your Watchlist. The Relationship Finder does not use your DNA results; it helps you find common ancestors between people.

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Ancestry has announced that coming soon will be improved matching for AncestryDNA autosomal tests. The improvements will make AncestryDNA matching more accurate. This will be rolled out to all existing AncestryDNA members for free. They will not need to take another DNA test. You’ll get an email when your new DNA matching results are ready.

New algorithms will be used to find and predict relationships through DNA. This means that the list of your matches will be a little smaller, since the less accurate ones will not be displayed any more.

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The search form at Ancestry will be changing. This will be rolled out over the next few weeks.

The term “Advanced Search” is now called “Show more options.” This will let you add more items to your search.

As you enter a word to search for, you’ll see a link appear where you can change how exact or board you want the search to be.

Another change appears at the bottom of the page in the Collection section. You will now be able to set the country you want to see results from. In the previous version, results from the country specified would be listed on top with some records from other countries also listed.

Anne Gillespie Mitchell has made a 5-minute video about the changes and of course I’ll have a link in the show notes to it.

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Ancestry has partnered with the Oklahoma Historical Society to add more than 3.2 million American Indian records and images available to Ancestry subscribers. The records are available now.

These new records include census counts, treaties, land allotments, marriage certificates and citizenship documents.

One collection called Oklahoma and Indian Territory, Dawes Census Cards for Five Civilized Tribes, 1898-1914 are in color. This makes the documents easier to read to see all the writing. Previous black and white images made some areas too dark to read.

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Ancestry has also added London, England Workhouse records for parishes in central and west London. These are provided in association with the London Metropolitan Archives. More records from other areas of London are expected to be added soon.

And they’ve added Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps service records 1917-1920, and Women’s Royal Naval Service (1917 – 1919). These last two collections are from The National Archives of the UK.

Another World War I collection has been added for records of people who served in WWI and were entitled to medals and awards. The records are mostly for those who served in the Army but there are some records for the Royal Flying Corps/Royal Air Force, civilians in military establishments such as doctors and nurses in hospitals, and others who were involved with the War.

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Ancestry will be having Twitter chats using the hashtag #AncestryChat. These chats will be about a specific topic and moderated by professional genealogists at Ancestry.

These chats will be 1- 2 times per month. They will be announced on the Ancestry Facebook page under “Events.”

The next chat is scheduled for November 20th and the topic will be Native American Research.

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The latest research guide from Ancestry is for Nevada. In the guide you’ll find out about the history of Nevada, significant dates, where to find vital records, military records, and other collections and state resources.

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FamilySearch adds more than 3.4 million indexed records and images to the Bahamas, Cape Verde, Peru, and the United States

FamilySearch Adds More Than 1.2 Million Indexed Records and Images to Argentina, the Dominican Republic, France, and the United States

FamilySearch Adds More Than 3.7 Million Indexed Records and Images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, and the United States

More new records at FamilySearch

New browsable image collections added include
Australia, New South Wales, Census (fragment), 1841
Canada, Nova Scotia Probate Records, 1760–1993
Cape Verde, Republic of Cape Verde, Catholic Church Records, 1787–1957
Peru, Municipal Census, 1831–1866
US, Iowa, County Death Records, 1880–1992
US, Ohio, Crawford County Church Records, 1853–2007
US, Ohio, Licking County, Hartford Township Records, 1881–1962
US, Ohio, Northern District, Eastern Division, Naturalization Index, 1855–1967

This collection for Iowa, I’ve used and it is indexed. There’s been some update to it and it isn’t a new browsable collection as they have listed.

The next collection has had indexed records and images added to an existing collection
Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903–1998
Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874–1996
Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005
US, BillionGraves Index
US, New York, State Census, 1865

The next collections have added indexed records to an existing collection
Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635–1981
France, Protestant Church Records, 1536–1863
South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801–2004
US, California, San Francisco Passenger Lists, 1893–1953
US, Kentucky Death Records, 1911–1961
US, Louisiana, Orleans Parish Second District Judicial Court Case Files, 1846–1880
US, Maine, Nathan Hale Cemetery Collection, ca. 1780–1980
US, Virginia, African-American Funeral Programs, 1920–2009

These collections have added images to an existing collection
Dominican Republic, Civil Registration, 1801–2010
Isle of Man, Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598–2009
US, California, San Mateo County, Colma, Italian Cemetery Records, 1899–2011
US, Idaho, Lincoln County Records, 1886–1972
US, Illinois Probate Records, 1819–1988
US, Louisiana, Orleans Court Records, 1822–1880
US, Louisiana, Orleans Parish Will Books, 1805–1920
US, Louisiana, State Penitentiary Records, 1866–1963
US, Maryland, Register of Wills Records, 1629–1999
US, New Hampshire, Cheshire County, Probate Estate Files, 1886–1900
US, North Carolina, County Records, 1833–1970
US, Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813–1932
US, Ohio, Trumbull County Records, 1795–2010
US, South Dakota, School Records, 1879–1970
US, Tennessee, Cocke County Records, 1860–1930
US, Tennessee, Probate Court Files, 1795–1955
US, Utah, Cache County Records, 1861–1955
US, Virginia, Isle of Wight County Records, 1634–1951
US, Washington, County Marriages, 1855–2008
US, Washington, County Records, 1803–2010
US, Washington, Pierce County Marriage Returns, 1891–1950

And this next collection has added indexed records to an existing collection.
Bahamas, Civil Registration, 1850–1959

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FamilySearch has also added some new military collections. Veteran’s Day was November 11th and in commemoration of that day FamilySearch added three new World War I collections. These records were made available in collaboration with the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington DC, The National Archives in Kew, Surrey, England, and findmypast.com.

The new collections are

United States World War I Draft Registration Cards 1917-1918
United Kingdom WWI Service Records 1914-1920
United Kingdom WWI Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps Records 1917-1920

All the FamilySearch History Centers and the Family History Library in Salt Lake City will have available the MyHeritage Library Edition. MyHeritage’s new service provides libraries access to their records.

There are more than 4,700 FamilySearch History Centers in 134 countries. These history centers are open to anyone and they provide resources to help you find your ancestors. You can order microfilm from the Family History Library and view it in the history center. The history centers also provide free access to many subscription services such as

19th Century British Newspapers
Newspaper Archives
Alexander Street Press (American Civil War Collections)
Ancestry.com (Family History Library Edition)
ArkivDigital Online (for Swedish research)
FindMyPast
Fold3.com
HeritageQuest Online
Historic Map Works (Library Edition)
Origins.net
Paper Trail, A Guide to Overland Pioneer Names and Documents
WorldVitalRecords.com

Your public library probably has access to Ancestry Library Edition and HeritageQuest Online.

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MyHeritage has introduced a new and enhanced online family tree editor. The old tree editor was based on Adobe Flash technology which is not very popular today.

The new tree editor has been developed from scratch using new technology such as HTML5 and Angular JS. The new tree editor is faster and easier to use. And it runs on smart phones and tablets.

Record matches can be accessed directly from the new tree editor. These are matches in historical records for the person being displayed in the editor.

The new version of the online tree editor has been released gradually to get feedback from users. This past week MyHeritage made the new version available to all users.

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MyHeritage is collecting favorite holiday recipes and the stories behind them for a cookbook. A selection of the best recipes will be included in a special international holiday cookbook.

The one with the best recipe and story will win a personal chef to prepare a delicious meal for you and your family in your home.

To enter send an email to stories@myheritage.com with a subject line of Holiday Recipe. Send the recipe, a story, and photos. The photo can be the dish, a holiday family photo, or a photo of whose recipe it is.

The final cookbook will be posted on the MyHeritage blog.

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MyHeritage has announced partnerships with a national TV marketing initiative to strengthen its presence in the Netherlands. MyHeritage will support the Aldfaer Foundation which has a free genealogy program written in Dutch called Aldfaer. The support from MyHeritage will allow the Foundation to offer integration of MyHeritage’s Smart Matching and Record Matching to users of the Aldfaer program.

MyHeritage will also partner with Bob Coret of Coret Genealogie. He is a respected genealogist and technologist in the Dutch genealogy community. He runs Genealogie Online, an online family tree publishing service.

Mr. Coret will become a strategic advisor and technologist with MyHeritage to work on offerings in the Netherlands and develop new opportunities within the Dutch market.

MyHeritage matching technologies will be added to the Genealogie Online service. Those users will not need to transfer their data to MyHeritage to make new discoveries. There will be more intergrations with MyHeritage and Coret Genealogie in the future.

There will be a TV ad campaign in the Netherlands for MyHeritage. The ad shows a MyHeritage user sharing their stories using the service. It’s narrated by a well-known Dutch celebrity actor. Besides the TV ad in the Netherlands, there is also another national TV campaign in Norway.

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Findmypast has announced a partnership with the Wall Street Journal. Subscribers to the Journal can get a complimentary three-month subscription to Findmypast.

First you have to sign up for WSJ+ membership which is free for Wall Street Journal subscribers. This is a subscriber loyalty program of The Wall Street Journal

To join WSJ+ you have to agree to some new terms.

Also WSJ+ users can get a complimentary year of Evernote premium. This is only for U.S subscribers and you must be past your initial trail period of your WSJ subscription.

With this version of Evernote you can access Journal content in Evernote, save and clip articles from The Wall Street Journal straight to Evernote.

Currently this Evernote offer applies to iOS only, Android is coming soon.

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Findmypast has added over 444,000 UK probate records for York, Lichfield, Cheltenham, Surrey, Sussex, Kent, and Gloucestershire. In these collections you’ll find probate indexes, wills, inventories, administrations, and abstracts

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They’ve also added Thom’s Directory 1844 – 1900. This is a useful census substitute for tracing families in Dublin.

It’s a street directory and almanac. It lists the merchants, clergy, lawyers, gentlemen, masons, blacksmiths, and others who were working in Dublin.

Findmypast has released over 256,000 new wills and probate records. The following collections were added:

Oxfordshire Wills index 1516-1857
York Peculiars Probate Index 1383-1883
Somerset Medieval Will abstracts 1385-1558
Hertfordshire Probate records index 1415-1858
England & Wales published wills & probate indexes 1300-1858
Surrey, Prerogative Court of Canterbury will abstracts 1736-1794
London & Middlesex Will Abstracts 1700-1704
Lancashire Wills Proved at Richmond 1457-1812
London, Court of Husting will abstracts 1258-1688

And they’ve added lots of records for Devon. There are many new records for baptisms, banns which are announcement of marriages, marriages starting with the year 1446, and burials from 1320 – 1926. There is a Devon wills index spanning the years 1163 to 1999 and it contains over 250,000 records proved by 30 courts.

10 years of Pettigrew & Oulton’s Dublin Almanac & General Register of Ireland has been added to the Newspapers, Directories and Social History records. It contains a street by street directory of Dublin from 1835 to 1845.

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BillionGraves has added some new features. You will now have 14 days instead of 7 days to transcribe your own photos before they are added to the general transcription pool. This gives more time to those photographers who want to transcribe their own photos.

There is a new linking records feature found on the transcription page. This allows you to link images together easily to make a complete record.

They have added functions for managing your images. You can easily correct errors of transcribed records, delete unwanted images that were uploaded, and link records. This gives you the ability to easily manage your own photos.

Sticky Filters have been updated to remember your selected transcribing filters between sessions. The next time you return, BillionGraves will remember where you left off.

——

Dick Eastman is a well-known genealogist who writes Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. You can read it in blog format or get it in an emailed version that is sent weekly.

Dick has started another blog called Privacy Blog and you can find it at privacyblog.com. He posts about security and privacy issues and how you can improve your privacy and be secure.

Titles of recent posts were

How to Find a Lot of Personal Information about Anyone
Cell Phone Privacy, Opt-Out Settings Don’t Protect Your Security Online
Why Are We Still Using Social Security Numbers to Identify Ourselves?
19 Automakers Vow to Protect Driver Privacy

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Fold3 is making its World War II collection available for free until the end of November. Some of the most popular titles in the collection are

Missing Air Crew Reports, WWII
WWII US Air Force Photos
WWII “Old Man’s Draft” Registration Cards
WWII War Diaries

Some new and updated titles in the collection include the following

Ardelia Hall Collection: Wiesbaden Property Cards
307th Bomb Group Records
500th Bomb Group Records
70th Infantry Division Records

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The Detroit News has moved to a new location and in preparation staffers have been poring over 100 years worth of information. They’ve placed most to this archival material online for the public to use.

One useful item will be the indexed cards to find articles in the newspaper. It should be available online within two or three months at SeekingMichigan.org.

10 to 14 million images from the newspaper will be digitized and placed online. Most of these are from 1980s – 2002. An index will be created for these photos and there will be galleries created.

Some of the materials will need to be accessed at the Archives of Michigan.

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The city of Greenville, Michigan has its newspapers online thanks to the Greenville Library. The newspapers date back to 1857.

Funding came from the Greenville Area Community Foundation’s Stafford Fund for Community Enhancement. It allowed for the microfilm containing the newspapers to be digitized. Optical character recognition was used to make the newspapers searchable.

The following newspapers were digitized:

Greenville Independent
The Daily Call
The Greenville Daily News
Belding Banner
The Daily News

The years from 1857 to 1923 are available online. The years from 1924 to 2010 are only available at the library due to copyright restrictions. These later years have also been digitized.

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The California State Library is digitizing more than 10,000 3-D photos. These photos are known as stereoscopic photos that were popular in the late 1800s.

There were like postcards but they need to be viewed using a hand-held viewer that turned the two photos into a single 3-D image.

The photos were taken by professionals and amateur photographers. The subjects range from scenic vistas, major events, and portraits of Americans at work and play.

They are placing the photos at a site called Phereo, a 3-D photo-sharing site. From there you can view the images in different formats. You can see the individual images side-by-side. If you have the red-and-blue cardboard glasses you can view the images in full 3-D.

So far there are only 93 images available to view out of the 10,000. The images can be found at phereo.com/CaliforniaStateLibrary.

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The CanadianHeadstones site has had the one millionth headstone photo uploaded. The Headstone Photo Project is a non-profit organization run by volunteers. The project was launched in 2009 to photograph and transcribe tombstones across Canada.

At the site there is a separate website and database for each province and territory. It’s a free site where you can search by surname, first name, starts with, contains, and sounds like.

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Saskatchewan newspapers are starting to be available online. This first stage focuses on Saskatchewan newspapers published during the Great War, 1914 – 1918. There are newspapers from across the province, which were published in English, French, German, and Ukrainian.

Right now you can only search by newspaper title, article name, and place. In the future you should be able to search the full text of the articles. And of course you can browse the newspapers by date.

Eventually the site will contain all the newspapers from 1878 through to the mid 1960s.

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There’s a new YouTube channel you may be interested in. The British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO) has launched its YouTube channel with a recent lecture by Lucille Campey. Her presentation was titled “Ignored But Not Forgotten: Canada’s English Immigrants.” It was recorded during the 20th Annual BIFHSGO Family History Conference held September 19-21, 2014 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

The presentation was about a book written by Lucille Campey. The title of the book is the same as the title of the presentation. The talk gives an overview of English immigration into Canada mostly during the early twentieth century.

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These next few items about Canada come from Gail Dever who writes the blog Genealogy à la carte.

The first item of interest is a comprehensive list of groups and pages on Facebook that pertain to Canadian genealogy.

Gail compiled the list. She got the idea from Katherine R. Wilson who has created a similar list. However, Katherine’s list does not contain any groups and pages that are in French. Gail’s list does contain groups and page in French as well as English.

Gail plans to keep the list up-to-date and she will be issuing a new list every few months when there have been a sufficient number of additions.

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Another item of interest from Gail’s blog is another new YouTube channel. This one in French but it is old videos. So even if you don’t speak French, the videos may be of interest to you.

The YouTube channel is from the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ) or Library and National Archives of Quebec. It contains films about Quebec’s cultural heritage.

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Another item of interest for those with Quebec ancestry is a new site that contains an index of articles published by the Genealogical Society of Quebec and the French-Canadian Genealogical Society.

The articles are indexed by subject or keyword, title, author, and years.

Gail mentions on her blog not to be daunted by the French text. It’s easy to figure out. Google translate can help you find French words to search by.

The results from a search will show you the name of the article and the publication. So hopefully you will be able to find a copy. One of the publications, The Ancestor, can be ordered online from the web site for the Genealogical Society of Quebec.

Another publication, Memories, can be ordered from the French-Canadian Genealogical Society website.

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A new database has come online for some historical photographs from Winnipeg, Manitoba. The site is called Winnipeg FOCUS and contains photographs and graphic materials held by the City of Winnipeg.

Many of the photographs were taken by civic employees in the course of their work to document projects. Some photographs were donated to the Archives.

The images have been tagged with key information by the Archives’ staff. Additional key information will be added and everyone is encouraged to participate in this process by submitting comments.

At the moment, the collection includes only a fraction of the thousands of images in the Archives holdings. Additions to the website will be on going.

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Another new website about Canada is called Canada’s Great War Album. It’s based on a book by the same name which you can purchase from the website.

The book and site contain family stories and photographs from the First World War.

At the website there’s information about battles and other sections about the war. There are some videos and you can submit your story at the website.

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There is a new licensing scheme in the UK that gives access to about 91 million orphan works. Orphan works are those that the copyright holder cannot be determined. In the United States these works are protected under copyright law and cannot be made digitally available.

In the UK under the new scheme these orphan works can be reproduced on websites, books, or TV. If the copyright holder is found, they will be paid for how their work was used.

Some of the creative works that can be made available will include diaries, photographs, oral history recordings, and documentary films.

More of these works will become available online and be displayed in museums.

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The British Library, Wikimedia, and OpenStreetMap are trying to identify all the maps in the Mechanical Curator collection. These maps were extracted and digitized from 19th century books. They have been placed on Flickr and tagged with “map.”

They need people to flag more images on Flickr as maps. Then they need people to create an overlay of historic maps on current mapping and compare the past with the present.

Those wishing to participate with this effort will need a Flickr account to view the maps then use the British Library’s Georeferencer crowd activity to match the old map with where it corresponds with a recent map.

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The British Newspaper Archive has reached a major milestone. It now has 9 million historical newspaper pages online.

They focus on local titles from all around the UK. It was launched in November 2011. It now has 282 British and Irish newspaper titles online, covering the years 1710 – 1954.

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British genealogy research website TheGenealogist has released over 81,000 records of records of Mentioned in Dispatches from the First World War. Searching these records will bring up the rank, regiment, data mentioned in the London Gazette, the page number, and type of decoration.

From these records you can find soldiers and army nurses who were recognized for their acts of gallantry. The records were created when the recipient’s name appeared in an official report sent to the high command.

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The website Essex Ancestors is maintained by the Essex Records Office. It a subscription site and has parish registers and wills for Essex.

They have added another 22,500 wills to the site. The site already contained 20,000 wills and now it contains over 40,000 wills.

The Essex Records Office has 70,000 wills so more will be coming online.

The online collection now contains wills dating from the 1400s to 1720. They will be working on the years 1720 – 1858 to get the whole collection online.

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There’s a new website that contains information on soldiers from Australia and New Zealand. It’s called “Discovering Anzacs” and is to commemorate the centenary of World War I.

The website is the result of a partnership between the National Archives of Australia and Archives of New Zealand. Both organizations have been digitizing their World War I service records and they can now be found at one website.

Previously the National Archives of Australia had a website called “Mapping our Anzacs.” All entries from that website have been migrated to the new website.

Anyone can contribute to the site by entering stories, images, or comments at the site. And they can help transcribe the records.

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If you have Irish ancestors you may remember that many birth, marriage, and death indexes became available online at irishgenealogy.ie. That happened last July and they were quickly taken down.

The indexes were for the years 1845 until today. The Data Protection Commissioner in Ireland thought the indexes exposed too much sensitive personal information.

The Data Protection Commissioner had been consulted about the launch of the indexes and thought they would be about historical information and not information about living individuals.

A compromise has been reached so that recent information will not be available. The Data Protection Commissioner agreed that if it was limited to data on births more than 100 years old, marriages more than 75 years old and deaths more than 50 years old, they could be placed online.

The bill for this to occur has passed the committee stage. The indexes are still not available.

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The Irish War Memorial Records contain the list of names of over 49,000 men who died in the First World War. This list contains many errors and double-entries. Also they include non-Irish soldiers who died in Irish regiments and they exclude some Irish who died in non-Irish regiments.

When the records were created they did not include the navy or the artillery. They also did not include other battalions that had Irish soldiers such as the Canadian and Australian battalions.

Using these records it’s difficult to determine how many Irish men were killed in the war. Historians believe that it could be between 30,000 and 40,000.

The records are found at a website called Ireland’s Memorial Records from the In Flanders Fields Museum.

A scholarship is being set up for students to spend time with the records to make collections more accurate. Scholarships are available for 5 students to spend the summer months at the In Flanders Field Museum. Their task is to expand the digital archive that was begun earlier this year by Google and the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Scholarships will begin next year and run until 2018.

Google has also announced a digital exhibition commemorating the Irish in the war at the Google Digital Cultural Institute. The exhibit aims to preserve the memory of the Irish who perished during the war. It contains information about the Irish War Memorial Records.

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The Commonwealth War Grave Commission has created an app for searching for cemeteries around the world where casualties from the First and Second World Wars are buried.

The app uses your location to show you cemeteries nearby or you can search for cemeteries to see images from the cemetery.

The app works on Apple, Android, and Windows devices.

You can also find a more comprehensive version of it at their website. From the website version you can get a list of those who are buried in the cemetery or search by surname to find out where soldiers are buried.

The Guild of One-Name Studies has announced three new services.

The first new service is a pilot project that will allow members to record surname interests other than their registered name(s). Members will not have to register a full-blown one-name study in order to record an interest in a surname. It’s hoped that this will lead to an increase in the number of surnames registered for a one-name study.

The second new service is a project to make it easier for members to work together on large studies such as surnames like Smith. Study associates will allow members to collaborate on a one-name study. They will be able to help when a member is no longer actively conducting research or where someone no longer wants to be the owner of the study.

The third new service is a pilot project that will enable members to preserve their one-name study with the Guild. This will allow the one-name website of each participating member to continue indefinitely as a live website.

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There is a new society called The Surname Society. It’s not associated with the Guild of One-Name Studies. Quoting from the press release

the online society for individuals, groups and associations with an interest in surname studies, regardless of their location in the world, the surname they are studying, or their level of research expertise.

The Chair of this new society is Kirsty Grey. She was previously the Chairman of The Guild of One-Name Studies in the UK until this past April. This new society is also based in the UK with a similar theme. Kirsty Grey is also the cofounder of the Society for One-Place Studies.

Members of the new society are encouraged to develop their own study methods in their investigations into a surname. A study can be worldwide or restricted to a certain area. The Surname Society will help and advise members on ways to conduct their study.

Collaboration is entirely online. It’s hoped to develop new surname studies using modern technologies to support 21st century researchers.

The cost to join the society is £5 yearly which is $7.82 as of the day of this recording which is November 15, 2014. Once you have joined you can register as many names as you want.

They are planning on having two Google Hangouts per month. One will be for Europe and Australia on the second Saturday of the month and the other one for the month will be for Europe and the America on the fourth Saturday. You may want to check those Saturdays, that’s what’s posted on the website but in the Google Hangout announcing the new society they mentioned the hangouts would be the first and third Saturdays of the month.

They have lots more things planned that will be coming online.

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The National Library of Estonia has launched DIGAR Estonian Newspapers. DIGAR stands for digital archive.

There are 85 newspapers at the portal that were published before 1944 and newspapers that were publish since January 1, 2014. The other years require agreements from the publishers.

And of course the site is in Estonian.

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The National Genealogy Society has announced the full program for the 2015 Family History Conference that will be held in St. Charles, Missouri, May 13 – 16, 2015. The theme of the conference is Crossroads of America.

The registration brochure gives details about social events, tours, workshops, and the daily conference program with the name of the lecture, the speaker, and a brief description of the presentation.

Registration will open December 1, 2014 for the conference.

——

The big joint conference coming up in February 2015 is RootsTech and the Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference. They have announced that the keynote speaker for Friday will be A. J. Jacobs. He’s the guy who is setting up the Global Family Reunion that will be held in New York this coming June.

The Global Family Reunion is open to anyone but the fun is to see if you are somehow related to A. J. Jacobs. If you are you will get a bracelet at the reunion and be part of the biggest family photo.

There will be a $20 admission fee that will go toward Alzhemier’s research.

——

Popular musician and YouTube sensation Alex Boye along with One Voice Children’s Choir, a quarter-finalists from NBC’s America’s Got Talent, kick off RootsTech 2015 with performances on Thursday, February 12th at the Salt Palace Convention Center.

The two musical talents have collaborated before and will be uniting to give a special performance.

——

The 2017 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference will be held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 30 – September 2.

The 2016 conference will be in Springfield, Illinois and the 2018 conference will be in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

——

The Federation of Genealogical Societies will be having a cruise to Alaska that will depart from Seattle, Washington, and last 7 days.

The ports of call will include Alaskan cities Juneau and Skagway and Victoria and British Columbia.

This is a genealogy cruise, so not only to you get to see the sights, you can also attend lectures while at sea. The speakers for this cruise will be Elizabeth Shown Mills, David E. Rencher, Judy G. Russell, and D. Joshua Taylor.

——

Registration for The Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR) at the Samford University Library will open on Tuesday, January 20th. These session fill up fast so you need register as soon as registration opens.

The 2015 Institute begins Sunday, June 7th, and concludes Friday, June 12th. The courses for 2015 are

Methods and Sources (Coordinator: Pam Sayre)
Intermediate Genealogy & Historical Studies (Coordinator: Angela McGhie)
Advanced Methodology & Evidence Analysis (Coordinator: Judy Russell)
Writing & Publishing for Genealogists (Coordinator: Tom Jones)
Military Records II (Coordinator: Craig Scott)
The Five Civilized Tribes: The Records & Where to Find Them (Coordinator: Linda Geiger)
Land Records: Using Maps (Coordinator: Rick Sayre)
Research in the South: The Colonies of the South (Coordinator: Mark Lowe)
Genealogy as a Profession (Coordinator: Elissa Powell)
Virginia’s Land & Military Conflicts (Coordinator: Victor Dunn)

——

FamilySearch has announced some webinars for 2015. During the month of January there will be 10 webinars about England and Wales. Then in April there will be 9 webinars about Scotland. And in July there will be 5 webinars about Wales.

Illinois Genealogical Society has announced their 2015 free webinar lineup. These webinars are typically held the second Tuesday of each month at 9pm eastern.

They are free for anyone to attend live and members of the society have access to them through the Members Section of the ISGS website to watch anytime.

——

Coming up

Monday, November 17, 8pm eastern
Board for Certification of Genealogists Webinar
‘Of Sound Mind and Body’: Using Probate Records in Your Research
presented by Michael Hait

Tuesday, November 18, 1pm eastern
Ancestry Live Event
Can Anyone Read This? Basic Paleography for Genealogists
presented by Crista Cowen

Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 3pm eastern
New England Historic Genealogical Society
Sharing Your Family History: Ideas from NEHGS
presented by Penny Stratton

Tuesday, November 18, 8pm eastern
Wisconsin State Genealogical Society Webinar
Time Travel with Google Earth
presented by Lisa Louise Cooke

#genchat – The UK Archives
Wednesday, November 19th, noon eastern

Wednesday, November 19, 1pm eastern
MyHeritage Webinar: Discover your military ancestors

Wednesday, November 19 2014, 2pm eastern
Legacy Webinar – Using Evernote for Genealogy
presented by Lisa Louise Cooke

Wednesday, November 19, 8pm eastern
Georgia Genealogical Society
What’s a Palatine Anyway?
presented by James M. Beidler

Wednesday, November 19, 9pm eastern
Southern California Genealogical Society
The WWI Draft Card: Don’t Do Research Without It!
presented by Tim Pinnick

Thursday, November 20, 1pm eastern
Ancestry Live Event
AncestryDNA: Q&A
presented by Crista Cowen

Thursday, November 20, 8pm eastern
#AncestryChat
Native American Research

Thursday, November 20, 8pm eastern
Florida State Genealogical Society Poolside Chat
On Mountain or Prairie: Treasures in Federal Land Records
presented by Warren Bittner

Thursday November 20, 9pm eastern
Utah Genealogical Association
“Using Technology to See Things More Clearly”
presented by Peg Ivanyo

Friday, November 21, time to be announced
North Carolina Genealogical Society
Finding a North Carolina Revolutionary War Ancestor
presented by Craig Scott
free to view Fri, 5 Dec 2014 – Sun, 7 Dec 2014

Friday, November 21, 8pm eastern
Twitter #IDGChat – Brick Walls
http://theindepthgenealogist.com/2014-idgchat-schedule/

Tuesday, November 25, 1pm eastern
Ancestry Live Event
Genealogy Source Checklists
presented by Crista Cowen

#genchat – Accessing state collections
Friday, November 28th, 10pm eastern
And that’s it for this episode.

You can send email to geneatopia@gmail.com

You can find links to things mentioned in this show in the show notes at Geneatopia.com as well as a transcript. The transcript can also be found in the Geneatopia Flipboard magazine.

This is episode 54.

Thanks for listening.

 

Listen to the episode.

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